IS MY BABY A PICKY EATER?

No. Your baby is a rookie eater.

“Picky eating” is a label that can be potentially damaging to your tiny human as their eating journey progresses. It is common for babies to make faces, flinch, even spit food out when they experience something new. It can take up to 15 tries before a baby accepts a new flavor. Babies are more likely to accept sweet and salty foods like cereal and fruit, and reject bitter foods, like vegetables. Introducing vegetables early and often increases the likelihood of acceptance can lead to healthier diet patterns later in life. The early and often introduction of vegetables has also been shown to decrease the risk of obesity throughout the lifespan.

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We prefer the term “rookie” as opposed to “picky”. Everyone is learning here. You are learning to take cues from your tiny human, and your tiny human is learning what different flavors and textures feel like in their mouth. If they make a face or two don’t panic. It’s totally normal.

You know what else is normal? NEEDING HELP! Raised Real sends you the meals and the help to turn your rookie eater into a lifelong healthy food lover.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

No. Your baby is a rookie eater.

“Picky eating” is a label that can be potentially damaging to your tiny human as their eating journey progresses. It is common for babies to make faces, flinch, even spit food out when they experience something new. It can take up to 15 tries before a baby accepts a new flavor. Babies are more likely to accept sweet and salty foods like cereal and fruit, and reject bitter foods, like vegetables. Introducing vegetables early and often increases the likelihood of acceptance can lead to healthier diet patterns later in life. The early and often introduction of vegetables has also been shown to decrease the risk of obesity throughout the lifespan.

We prefer the term “rookie” as opposed to “picky”. Everyone is learning here. You are learning to take cues from your tiny human, and your tiny human is learning what different flavors and textures feel like in their mouth. If they make a face or two don’t panic. It’s totally normal.

SOURCES:
American Academy of Pediatrics
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention